Trump dumps the Paris Agreement...what now?

In the US, science and sustainability has had a rough year. We've seen alt-facts, skinny budgets, climate denying administrators, and now withdrawal from the Paris Agreement. As I said on Twitter yesterday and today, the most mind-boggling part of yesterday's...

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A vision for research: revisited

This blog was originally written for Leopold Leadership 3.0. A bit more than a year ago, my lab and I spent a day trying to figure out who we were and what we were about…

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Sharing the results of federally-funded research

The National Science Foundation requires that all grant recipients submit annual and final reports. I just submitted a final report for our grant, "Assessing temperature-related changes in introgression of hybridizing species across space and time." In the spirit of promoting the...

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5th & 6th grader questions about climate change

The following came up after my presentation, "What is global warming?" to 5th and 6th graders at the Stanley Clark School, South Bend, IN. Thanks to the students for being so attentive and for their great follow-up questions!   1....

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Beauty and Benefits of Escaping the Ivory Tower

A group of Leopold Leadership Fellows are presenting at the AAAS meeting in Boston, February, 2013. We are looking to engage conversation on our general session topic and specifically on time-effective methods of engaging in environmental outreach (Hellmann & Williams below). Join...

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Four reasons to pursue science

I delivered the following lecture on Saturday, Nov. 10 to competitors at the Siemens science, math, and technology regional competition at the University of Notre Dame. Siemens competitors at high school students but my main points--that love of nature, sense...

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Is conservation as we know it going to be enough?

Climate change will present new challenges to achieving ecosystem conservation and sound management of natural resources. Thanks to climate change, some species will increase, others will decrease, and the productivity of ecosystems will shift in ways that are difficult to...

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Nature’s clock and climate change

March in the Midwest and East US was very warm, usually so. Chicago experienced 8 days over 80 degrees, when there is usually only one day over 80 degrees in April. Unofficial reports suggested that spring flowers and leaf flush...

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Scientist profiles at LiveScience.com

LiveScience, in collaboration with the National Science Foundation, is running a really interesting series that profiles scientists, what they do and why, and how they got to their position today. You can find all of the ScienceLives entries here. I think that Sally Otto…...

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Winter warming--some like it hot, others not

A study by Caroline Williams and Brent Sinclair of the University of Western Ontario, together with the Hellmann lab, was just published in PLoS One. The paper reports our findings that winter warming negatively affects overwintering butterflies by increasing their...

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Adaptation as a costly endeavor

Just found this blog post by Joe Romm, and it seems very interesting.  I hope to write on this idea sometime in the near future as related to adaptation for nature/wildlife.  In the meantime, I suggest checking it out: Real...

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Climate change adaptation: interdisciplinarity on steroids

I am at the Steve Schneider memorial symposium and am tweeting about a number of very interesting talks. In putting my own talk together, “Integrative climate science for this century: in training and practice,” I've been thinking about interdisciplinarity and...

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The value of dystopia

I've been spending some time recently with colleagues in English and Sociology (John Sitter and Andy Weigert). We are creating a minor in sustainability--an entirely new entity for my university--and a new introductory course for students in this field. We're...

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